Postcrete vs concrete: Which is better?

The article aims to answer the question “Postcrete vs concrete: Which is better?”. It will also explain how you can use postcrete and what advantages postcrete has over concrete.

Postcrete vs concrete: Which is better?

Postcrete is considered better than concrete because it is easier to use. All you have to do to install a post using postcrete is fill your post hole with water and throw the postcrete in. No further amalgamation is permitted. 

After that, around fifteen to twenty minutes, the postcrete will harden. Compared to concrete, which must be pre-mixed and mixed well before being placed, it is clear that postcrete is far simpler to use, at least when establishing posts.

In addition to cement, sand and ballast must be ordered and thoroughly combined to create concrete. For large-scale concrete production, a mixer is also necessary. Using a bucket or the floor may work, but they also have their drawbacks.

In rare cases, it may take several days for concrete to solidify completely. However, postcrete will harden in a matter of minutes and completely cure in a few hours. This is one of the key benefits of postcrete over concrete, combined with its simplicity of application.

Is postcrete as strong as concrete?

No, postcrete is not as strong as concrete. Compared to postcrete, concrete is a far more strong material. In contrast to concrete, where the size and quantity of ballast may be adjusted to taste, postcrete can only utilize extremely tiny pebbles as ballast. Strengthening the final concrete product may be accomplished by adding extra ballast to the mix.

This increases the likelihood of cracks or breaks in the postcrete. This is most noticeable at the postcrete’s outside borders. If you attempt to drill into the edge of a piece of set postcrete, you could discover that you produce a fracture and a significant part of the postcrete just comes off.

What is postcrete?

Postcrete, also known as Post Fixing Mix, is a pre-blended cement mixture with additives designed for installing wooden, concrete, and metal fence posts. A Post Fixing Mix, which just requires water to set, is sold in convenient 20-kilogram bags.

Postcrete typically sets in 5-10 minutes after water is added to the mix, with the solution starting to stiffen after just 1-2 minutes. Since the fence posts may cure in only a few hours, rather than the 24-48 hours required by regular commercial concrete, the installation process can go at a steady clip. 

Follow the given steps to know how to use postcrete:

When the holes for the posts have been excavated, set the post in the hole such that the face of the post is flush with the plumbline. The instructions in our fence-building manual should be useful here.

  • Fill the hole with water as directed on the bag.
  • To do this, just pour the mixture around the post until it completely covers the water.
  • It takes around 10 minutes for the mixture to set enough that you can safely release the post after you’re satisfied that it’s standing straight and true.
  • When the postcrete has fully dried, you may choose to cover it with dirt and grass.
  • The postcrete comes in convenient 20-kilogram bags, making it ideal for smaller jobs, while the knowledgeable team is always ready to lend a hand and provide advice for bigger tasks.

What is the difference between postcrete and concrete?

Continue reading the article to understand the difference between postcrete and concrete:

Commonly known as “concrete,” this technical substance had its heyday in the ’60s and ’70s as a staple of cutting-edge building design. Concrete is a composite substance made up of three separate but equally important ingredients: water, cement, and aggregate, which may be any combination of rock, sand, or gravel.

The strength, durability, and workability of the finished concrete are all affected by the proportions with which these three elements are blended. While a concrete mixer is necessary for large-scale applications, smaller batches may be mixed by hand in a basin or bucket. 

The optimal strength of conventional concrete is achieved after 25-28 days, however the setting time varies from 24 hours to 7 days, depending on the application. Post mix concrete, often known as “postcrete,” is a pre-blended, ready-to-use kind of concrete. 

Postcrete is an additive mix designed for installing tiny posts made of wood, metal, or concrete into the ground for temporary or permanent structures like fences. Traditionally, builders would have to either mix the sand and cement on site or have ready-mixed concrete supplied to install fence or gate posts. 

Because postcrete doesn’t need any further preparation before use, workers may spend less time waiting around for supplies and less time mixing cement. The consistency of the blend is guaranteed as well.

The fastest setting time for postcrete is 5-10 minutes under ideal circumstances, and it hardens completely in a matter of hours. This has the practical implication of allowing fence posts to be set up in fast succession, which streamlines the process of keeping a steady pace throughout the project. 

As a result, installing fence, gates, trellis, or any other heavy load on a post that has been set with postcrete may be reduced from a weekend’s worth of labor to a single day’s worth.

How do I use postcrete?

Follow the instructions below to know how can you use postcrete:

  • Post-Mix Concrete mostly excels due to the speed with which it sets. After adding water, the concrete will start to cure quickly and become hard in 10 to 20 minutes. 
  • Since the post may be straightened out while the mixture is still wet, this is great for establishing posts, and the post will be stable after the mixture has hardened. Ready-mixed concrete, or “Post Mix Concrete,” is a predetermined ratio of cement to aggregate that has been kiln-dried. 
  • Postmix, Postcrete, or Ready Mix is a kind of concrete used for installing wooden, metal, or concrete fence posts. It’s also great for little repairs around the yard, like mending laundry lines or putting together a playset for the kids.
  • Because concrete dust is an irritant, it is advised that protective gear be used while applying the dry Post Mix. To prevent water from pooling at the foot of the post, make sure the concrete is elevated slightly above ground level.
  • It might take hours or even days for traditionally mixed concrete to achieve the same consistency. The Post Mix has to cure for at least 4 hours before the post can withstand stress, such as when fence panels are being installed.

Conclusion

Postcrete is a pre-mixed, quick-setting concrete that may be used for a variety of purposes, whether you’re a professional or a weekend warrior. In the garden, it eliminates the need for precise measurements or a cement mixer by providing a sturdy base for fence and gate posts. Everything you wanted to know about Post Mix is right here.

Frequently asked questions (FAQS): Postcrete vs concrete: Which is better?

Postcrete vs concrete: Which is better?

Postcrete is considered better than concrete because it is easier to use. All you have to do to install a post using postcrete is fill your post hole with water and throw the postcrete in. No further amalgamation is permitted. 

After that, around fifteen to twenty minutes, the postcrete will harden. Compared to concrete, which must be pre-mixed and mixed well before being placed, it is clear that postcrete is far simpler to use, at least when establishing posts.

What is postcrete?

Postcrete, also known as Post Fixing Mix, is a pre-blended cement mixture with additives designed for installing wooden, concrete, and metal fence posts. A Post Fixing Mix, which just requires water to set, is sold in convenient 20-kilogram bags.

Postcrete typically sets in 5-10 minutes after water is added to the mix, with the solution starting to stiffen after just 1-2 minutes. Since the fence posts may cure in only a few hours, rather than the 24-48 hours required by regular commercial concrete, the installation process can go at a steady clip. 

Bibliography

How do I use postmix concrete? Retrieved from: https://www.avsfencing.co.uk/info-advice/article/?view=how-do-i-use-post-mix-concrete&id=593#:~:text=The%20exact%20amount%20of%20Post,require%20three%20or%20four%20bags.

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