How to stop fence posts rotting in concrete?

How to stop fence posts rotting in concrete?

  • It’s time to get rid of that old fence post. If it’s put in concrete, drill a hole under the bottom of the wooden post to create a pocket.
  • Dig a hole 10 inches deep where the fence post will go using a shovel. Fill the hole with gravel; this will assist support the post and provide proper drainage for water to flow through. Fill the hole with gravel.
  • Using a big paintbrush and waterproofing sealant, cover the whole post, including the part that will be buried.
  • Fill a bucket with waterproofing sealant and dip the post’s end (which will be buried underground) into it. For best results, let the post in the bucket of sealant overnight before allowing it to cure on its own.
  • Fill up the hole with dirt and secure the fence post in place by placing it on top of the gravel drainage layer.
  • Instead, Postsaver sleeves are an affordable and easy approach to prevent wood decay. Prior to securing them in place, they’re quickly wrapped around the bottom of the fence post. 
  • Because of how quickly and easily it can be applied, your fence posts may be shielded from dampness underneath in a flash. Compared to sleeveless posts, this non-toxic sleeve has the potential to increase the post’s longevity.
  • Putting the posts in the ground is the next step. A hole twice the diameter of the fence post should be dug, and it should be dug as deep as your frost line, which may range from 16 inches to 42 inches depending on your local construction regulations. 
  • So that the post’s end does not come into touch with the earth, the first three inches should be filled with gravel. Allowing water to flow away from the post and into the ground rapidly is made easier by using gravel.
  • The post should be centered in the hole.
  • Lastly, fill up the hole to the brim with cement. Concrete will keep the fence in place and prevent it from moving laterally. Domed top concrete that slopes away from the post provides additional protection by diverting water away from the post.

What tools do I need to stop fence posts rotting in concrete?

  • Shovel
  • Gravel 
  • Trowel 
  • U brackets 
  • screws 
  • Drill
  • Protective gear 
  • Cement 

Why do fence posts rot in concrete?

  • To some extent, placing the posts in concrete creates an environment that hastens the decay at the base of them. 
  • Pressure-treated posts will delay the decay. To prevent water from gathering around the base of the post, the concrete should be slanted away from the post to grade level.
  • Fence posts may now be inserted into the earth after treatment. Do not dig any deeper than the frost line, which might be up to 43 inches deep or as little as 15 inches deep. If you’re unsure about the depth, check with your city’s construction regulations. 
  • To prevent the post’s end from coming into touch with soil, use three inches of gravel to fill the first three inches of the hole. Because of its porous nature, gravel allows water to easily drain away from fence posts and into the soil.
  • Using a broad paintbrush, apply waterproofing sealant to the whole post, including the portion that will be buried. Fill a bucket with waterproofing sealant and dip the post’s end (which will be buried underground) into it.

How to fit concrete fence posts?

  • To place your concrete posts, you’ll need to drill appropriate holes. Using a gravel board, measure the distance between each fence post before drawing out the hole. Additionally, the hole should be around two feet deep.
  • Make sure the post is inserted into the hole and that everything is in the correct position.
  • Make sure that your concrete gravel planks fit snugly between the posts. After that, fill each hole with 40 kg of quick-setting concrete mix. 
  • To start the concrete setting, add the necessary water and keep the posts in place. Mixing the dry mix with water before filling the hole is also an option.
  • Before fitting the fence panels into the posts, let the concrete dry for at least one night.
  • Enjoy your new fence as soon as the panels are installed.
  • Make sure you obtain the right quantity of concrete for the task, whether you’re installing concrete fence posts or doing any other concrete DIY project. 
  • Take use of the Total Concrete concrete calculator to receive an exact estimate for your project.

How to fix trellis to fence with concrete posts?

  • Battens attached to the fence guarantee that the trellis has space between it and the fence for plants to coil themselves around it. 
  • In general, battens should be between 30mm and 60mm wide and the length of the trellis, depending on the size of your trellis. Inscribe on the fence where the trellis’s top and bottom will be. 
  • When you’re done, put the battens into place with a drill and wood screws. The middle of your trellis might benefit from a separate trellis. Fix the trellis to the battens, and then plant your climbers below.
  • If you can, leave a section of fence post above the fence for attaching trellis when you install the fence panels. You can, however, add wood battens to the posts of an existing fence if you’re extending it. 
  • To raise the fence to the desired trellis height, just attach the robust battens to the existing fence posts. In order to install the trellis panel, screw a U bracket halfway up the fence post or wood batten extension using 35mm screws. 
  • Assemble the trellis panel by securing it to the posts with 35mm screws through the bracket. Preserve the wood by painting or staining the trellis to match the fence.
  • Screwing into concrete posts can break or crack them, therefore avoid doing so. 
  • If your fence has concrete posts, the simplest approach to attach a trellis to the top is to use wooden battens to extend the posts up to the trellis’ height. 
  • These battens should be attached to the fence panels, not the concrete.

What is a concrete fence post?

Concrete Slotted fence posts have four internal steel reinforcing bars, making them a long-lasting alternative to timber posts. 

You can rely on the long-term durability of our concrete fencing posts, which are resistant to ground decay. Fence posts with a slotted design can accommodate all of our fencing panels.

Backbone of a robust and appealing garden fencing is the use of concrete fence posts. Concrete posts are the way to go if you want your fence to be more stable in the rainy season. 

If you’re merely seeking to beef up your existing posts, our concrete spurs are a good option. Concrete spurs are short concrete posts that can be bolted to your existing posts for further support. 

To put it another way, if you enjoy the aesthetic of the wooden posts, you may do your part to keep them sturdy.

How to install concrete posts?

  • Rather than using wood supports, concrete slotted posts for fencing or regular trellis panels provide a long-lasting and simple solution to this problem. If necessary, the trellis or panels can be removed and replaced.
  • For added security, you can install panel security brackets to keep the panels from being lifted out.
  • Each post has a weathered (Pyramid) top that is four-sided.
  • Slotted posts and fence panels work well with concrete gravel boards because they keep the bottom of the fence panel off the ground and prevent it from deteriorating prematurely.
  • If the fence will be installed on a slope, you will need to have the posts lengthened to allow the panels to step down it.
  • There are two common methods for anchoring concrete posts: a dry mix (approximately 7 to 1 with no additional water added) or a post mix (about 7 to 1 with no further water added) (follow directions on the bag).
  • The size and depth of the hole will determine how much of each is needed. To ensure a snug fit around the post, aim for a hole diameter of 200 to 250mm (8′′ to 10′′). 
  • The hole should be at least 600 mm (2 feet) deep, regardless of the fence’s height. 
  • We recommend utilizing a longer post and increasing the hole depth to a minimum of 750mm (2′ 6′′) for fences exceeding 1.5m in height.

Conclusion

To prevent decay, a fence post should be set in concrete to keep it dry in the event that water seeps into the soil. Fill the hole with cement after burying the fence post in gravel.

It’s not uncommon for high-quality fences to survive for a long time. This may reduce the life expectancy of the wooden fence posts, though. Unless the fence pillars are replaced, the sturdy fence panel will be rendered ineffective in high winds.

Frequently asked questions (FAQS): How to stop fence posts rotting in concrete?

How to stop fence posts rotting in concrete?

It’s time to get rid of that old fence post. If it’s put in concrete, drill a hole under the bottom of the wooden post to create a pocket.

Dig a hole 10 inches deep where the fence post will go using a shovel. Fill the hole with gravel; this will assist support the post and provide proper drainage for water to flow through. Fill the hole with gravel.

Using a big paintbrush and waterproofing sealant, cover the whole post, including the part that will be buried.

Fill a bucket with waterproofing sealant and dip the post’s end (which will be buried underground) into it. For best results, let the post in the bucket of sealant overnight before allowing it to cure on its own.

How to fit concrete fence posts?

To place your concrete posts, you’ll need to drill appropriate holes. Using a gravel board, measure the distance between each fence post before drawing out the hole. Additionally, the hole should be around two feet deep.

Make sure the post is inserted into the hole and that everything is in the correct position. Make sure that your concrete gravel planks fit snugly between the posts. After that, fill each hole with 40 kg of quick-setting concrete mix. 

To start the concrete setting, add the necessary water and keep the posts in place. Mixing the dry mix with water before filling the hole is also an option.

How to fix trellis to fence with concrete posts?

Battens attached to the fence guarantee that the trellis has space between it and the fence for plants to coil themselves around it. 

In general, battens should be between 30mm and 60mm wide and the length of the trellis, depending on the size of your trellis. Inscribe on the fence where the trellis’s top and bottom will be. 

When you’re done, put the battens into place with a drill and wood screws. The middle of your trellis might benefit from a separate trellis. Fix the trellis to the battens, and then plant your climbers below.

What is a concrete fence post?

Concrete Slotted fence posts have four internal steel reinforcing bars, making them a long-lasting alternative to timber posts. 

You can rely on the long-term durability of our concrete fencing posts, which are resistant to ground decay. Fence posts with a slotted design can accommodate all of our fencing panels.

Backbone of a robust and appealing garden fencing is the use of concrete fence posts. Concrete posts are the way to go if you want your fence to be more stable in the rainy season. 

Bibliography 

Extending Concrete Fence Posts to Add Trellis. Retrieved from: https://community.screwfix.com/threads/extending-concrete-fence-posts-to-add-trellis.208173/

Trellis on Top of Fence With Concrete Fence Posts. DIY doctor. Retrieved from: https://www.diydoctor.org.uk/forums/trellis-on-top-of-fence-with-concrete-fence-posts-t41351.html

What was missing from this post which could have made it better?

Leave a Comment