How to make a 10×10 concrete slab?

The article aims to answer the question “10×10 concrete slab?”. It will also mention how much it costs to pour a 10×10 concrete slab. Read on to know more:

How to make a 10×10 concrete slab?

Continue reading the article to know how you can make a 10×10 concrete slab:

Step 1: Prepare to pour concrete:

  • To indicate the boundary, bury four stakes in the earth. the four stakes with string. As you want the top of the cement slab to be, make sure the string is level and in the desired location. Use a carpenter’s square to square the corners.
  • Dig out enough dirt outside of the indicated space to accommodate three inches of rock and six inches of concrete. Dig a deeper trench around the slab’s outer border if you anticipate that the perimeter of your cement slab will be thicker.
  • In the cleared space, spread rock. When the entire open space is covered with three inches, level it as best you can.
  • To assist the concrete slab to adapt to temperature fluctuations without breaking, install a 1/2-inch reinforcing bar (also known as rebar) along the slab’s perimeter. Inside the area, use 10-by-10 welded wire mesh. 
  • By putting pieces of leftover wood below them, suspend the rebar and mesh over the rocks.
  • Using your string marker as a guide, construct the wooden forms for the concrete slab’s outside. Join 2-inch-by-10-inch wooden pieces with nails. Stakes are used to secure the timber.

Step 2: Pour concrete:

  • Use a yard hose to dampen the rock foundation. The concrete is poured. Concrete should be pushed into the corners. To create an even foundation, compact the concrete.
  • To ensure that the concrete was poured evenly, use a straight 2-foot-by-4-foot-by-12-foot piece of timber as a screed or leveling tool. Work the piece of timber across the top of the forms back and forth with the assistance of a companion. 
  • Fill up the low places with more concrete if necessary. Use a float to float the concrete. You could wish to add texture to the concrete using a specialized float before it completely hardens. The surface now has a non-slip coating.
  • If you want to construct something on top of the concrete, install anchor bolts every three to four feet along the slab’s perimeter. 24 hours after the concrete pour, remove the wooden forms. To make the concrete mix in with the surroundings, pile soil up against its sides.

How to calculate how much concrete I need for a 10×10 concrete slab?

Multiply the length, breadth, and depth to get how many cubic yards you’ll need. The hardest element of determining how many cubic yards you’ll need is calculating the depth. A concrete slab normally has a thickness of 4 inches. 

You should make the slab 5 or 6 inches deep if the particular slab you are pouring must sustain extremely heavy vehicle traffic. For illustration, we shall convert a 4-inch depth to feet. This implies that when determining how much concrete is required, you will use a depth of 0.35 feet. 

The formula will be written as 10 x 10 x 0.35. When you get the total, divide it by 27, which represents the number of cubic feet in a cubic yard. The quantity required for a 10 × 10 slab is 1.3 cubic yards; however, we usually add an additional 10% to account for any spills or changes in slab depth.

How much does a 10×10 concrete slab cost?

Pouring a typical 10×10 concrete slab typically costs between $670 and $930. On the other hand, the price of a 12×12 concrete slab can range from $796 to $1,476. The price of a 20×24 driveway slab can range from $1440 to $3360. Local concrete contractors are more than pleased to provide you with a free quote.

Can I make a 10×10 concrete slab with ready-made concrete?

Yes, you can surely make a 10×10 concrete slab with ready-made concrete.

For the majority of DIYers, ready-mix, crack-resistant concrete is the ideal material to use when making a concrete slab. The wet mixture is then placed into a ready-made wood mold and allowed to cure. 

The sides of the form are knocked off once the concrete has dried and the slab is prepared for usage. Sand, cement, gravel, and other additives are combined to create ready-mix concrete. Ready-mix concrete comes in bags and can be found in most home centers. 

It has all the ingredients needed to build concrete, minus the water. Purchase crack-resistant ready-mix to prevent the need for reinforcing bars (rebar) to be set for strength. On small-scale concrete slabs, its synthetic fibers obviate the requirement for rebar.

It takes power, organization, and speed to move concrete by hand in a wheelbarrow. You will need two helpers for this 3-by-3-foot slab. While a third person distributes the mixed concrete in the form, two persons will mix the concrete in the wheelbarrow.

How to pour a concrete slab?

To pour a concrete slab:

  • Lay down the approximate placement of the concrete slab in the chosen area using the tape measure, a rope, or a hose. Set the perpendicular lines with a carpenter’s square or a speed square.
  • Put a stake in the ground at each of the slab’s four corners with the help of the hammer. To outline the slab area, securely weave the twine between the posts.
  • Remove the grass or turf about 6 inches outside of the space you’ve indicated with a shovel or turf-cutting equipment. The idea is to give oneself more space to work on all sides.
  • Pour the all-purpose gravel from the opened bags into the slab building site. To flatten and compact the gravel, use the tamper tool.
  • Using the circular saw or electric miter saw, cut the four two-by-four sections that were marked off at 3 feet, 3 inches apiece. To construct the shape, hammer 16d galvanized nails into the planks. On the sub-base, place the form.
  • Four two-by-four scraps are cut to a length of approximately 12 inches, and each is sharpened to a point (one end only). Each stake should be driven into the earth close to a form corner. 
  • To assist support the shape, screw each stake into one of its sides using the cordless drill. Apply vegetable oil or a concrete form release agent, such as the water-based release agent from Kleen Kote, to the interior of the form.
  • Lightly mist the sub-base with the garden hose. Mix the ready-mix concrete in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions using the wheelbarrow, hoe, and hose. Pour it into the form once it resembles peanut butter in consistency. 
  • With a hoe and gloved hands, push the concrete around the shape. The concrete is simpler to deal with when somewhat more water is used than recommended. The strength of the concrete after curing will be reduced by too much water. 
  • If it’s absolutely essential, only add extra water. A little water goes a long way, so add it in 2-ounce portions. Screed the top of the concrete slab using a leftover 4-foot-long two-by-four. 
  • In order to level the concrete and eliminate any surplus, the screed is moved back and forth in a sawing motion. Allow the extra material to fall to the side for subsequent removal.
  • After screeding, use a hammer to tap the form’s exterior all over. This will eliminate any air and empty gaps that can give the edges a “honeycomb” appearance.
  • Until the surface water has evaporated, let the concrete settle. The slab’s surface should then be compacted and smoothed using a concrete hand float.
  • For a smoother surface, wait 10 to 20 minutes after floating before using a metal concrete trowel. By delicately sweeping a broom across the surface, you may leave it smooth or give it texture. 
  • To give the margins of the perimeter a firmer and more polished appearance, an edging trowel can be employed. Give the concrete 48 hours to cure. Throughout this time, keep the slab covered in plastic and continuously damp by spraying it with the garden hose. 
  • Although it may be walked on after the two-day interval, full strength normally develops after 28 days. Prior to placing any patio furniture on the slab, it is preferable to wait 7–10 days.

Conclusion

Concrete pouring is labor-intensive, but if you’re not intimidated by the effort, you can do it yourself. The preparation is a significant amount of the effort involved in pouring a concrete slab. 

A 10-by-10-inch concrete slab would be a decent size project, to begin with. This size works well as the foundation of a patio or the floor of a small shed. You may go on to pouring concrete for larger projects if you have a solid understanding of how to conduct the concrete work properly for this smaller job.

Frequently asked questions (FAQS): 10×10 concrete slab

How to calculate how much concrete I need for a 10×10 concrete slab?

Multiply the length, breadth, and depth to get how many cubic yards you’ll need. The hardest element of determining how many cubic yards you’ll need is calculating the depth. A concrete slab normally has a thickness of 4 inches. 

You should make the slab 5 or 6 inches deep if the particular slab you are pouring must sustain extremely heavy vehicle traffic. For illustration, we shall convert a 4-inch depth to feet. This implies that when determining how much concrete is required, you will use a depth of 0.35 feet. 

Can I make a 10×10 concrete slab with ready-made concrete?

Yes, you can surely make a 10×10 concrete slab with ready-made concrete.

For the majority of DIYers, ready-mix, crack-resistant concrete is the ideal material to use when making a concrete slab. The wet mixture is then placed into a ready-made wood mold and allowed to cure. 

The sides of the form are knocked off once the concrete has dried and the slab is prepared for usage. Sand, cement, gravel, and other additives are combined to create ready-mix concrete. Ready-mix concrete comes in bags and can be found in most home centers. 

How much does a 10×10 concrete slab cost?

Pouring a typical 10×10 concrete slab typically costs between $670 and $930. On the other hand, the price of a 12×12 concrete slab can range from $796 to $1,476. The price of a 20×24 driveway slab can range from $1440 to $3360. Local concrete contractors are more than pleased to provide you with a free quote.

Bibliography

How to pour a concrete slab? Hunker. Retrieved from: https://www.thespruce.com/pouring-concrete-slab-5025127

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