How to install shower in the basement without breaking concrete?

The article aims to answer the question “how to install a shower in the basement without breaking concrete?”. It also aims to list down the steps you can follow to make shower pan and shower walls with concrete at home.

How to install shower in the basement without breaking concrete?

  • Installing a basement shower over existing plumbing stub-outs is the most efficient and least costly way to do it without breaking concrete. 
  • If the stub-outs are already in place, you may save a lot of money and time by utilizing them to add a bathroom to your basement. You don’t need to break concrete to run your plumbing lines from the stub-outs.
  • Sewage is removed from a holding tank behind a toilet, tub, or shower and pumped into the home’s main drain (which connects to a sewer line or septic system) placed at a higher elevation in an up-flush drainage system. 
  • Grinder for liquefying solid waste is also included in the up flush system.
  • It is possible to hide the collecting tank behind a bathroom wall, or to incorporate it inside a toilet. 
  • An electrical outlet is required for pump operation, and the system must be connected to the home’s main drain and plumbing vent system. Home Depot and Amazon, for example, both sell up-flush toilets.
  • The shower must be raised in order to properly drain into an up-flush system. Per linear foot, the normal slope for a drainage pipe is 1/4-inch. An raised shower base is required to accommodate the drain slope and a P-trap fitted in the drain line under the shower. 
  • In order to get in the shower, you’ll have to go up approximately 6 inches. A raised shower base may be purchased from a store or built from treated timber.
  • When installing a raised shower in a basement, you’ll find that the ceiling height is already lower than in the rest of the home. When installing a basement shower, keep in mind the height constraints of all the people who will be using the facility.
  • The location of the shower will be determined by the up-flush drainage system in your bathroom. In general, it’s ideal to keep the shower, sink, or toilet as near as possible to the plumbing fixtures. 
  • The higher the shower, toilet, or sink floor has to be, the farther away from the collecting tank it must be for proper drainage.

What do I need to install a shower in the basement without breaking concrete?

  • Electrical outlet
  • Drill 
  • Drain
  • Shower
  • Tub 
  • Concrete
  • Protective gear

How to DIY concrete shower walls without breaking concrete?

You can build your shower walls with concrete. You’ll need to construct a pan if you want to tile the floor of your shower. It is the shower pan that rests under the tile in a shower. They’re designed so that water flows into the drains.

Because you don’t want puddles, leaks, or standing water in your shower, a well-built shower pan is essential. Custom shower pans can be purchased pre-made, but if you want to make one, you’ll have to do it yourself.

The quality of the concrete mix is critical here. Quikrete’s shower pan concrete mix is the finest on the market. Floor Mud and Sand/Topping mix are the two items they produce. Shower pans may be built using either method.

If you want to make your concrete mix, you can do so. To make a nice dry concrete pack, use a basic mortar mix, sand, and Portland cement. You may use any of these mixtures to protect your shower floor and tile from water.

Can I use quikrete floor mud?

Yes, Quikrete floor mud can be used to build shower pans and walls. It is a Portland Cement-based concrete mix. It’s an overlaying mortar for laying travertine, slate, and marble floor tiles and making shower pans as a dry pack mix.

It is simple to compress and shape the mixture to be poured down a drain. Having a water-resistant and smooth surface when it is created makes it ideal for laying tile.

Because QUIKRETE Floor Mud is pre-blended, there’s no need to measure out any of the components. It’s as simple as opening the bag, mixing it up, and getting to work. It’s a breeze to combine and use.

Add the needed water to a mixing tray, bucket, or wheelbarrow filled with Quikrete. For every 80-pound bag of the mix, you’ll need 4 quarts of water. It has the following benefits:

  • This mixture may support heavy stone tiles.
  • Use on the outside or inside.
  • After 28 days of cure, exceeds 5000 psi compressive strength
  • They are easier to use than making your mixes since the math is already done for you.
  • The contour and slope of the floor may be easily molded.

There’s no better concrete mix than Quikrete Floor Mud when it comes to shower pans. To my knowledge, it has never been sold at either Home Depot or Lowe’s. A tile supply shop is where we get ours from.

It might be difficult to achieve the right blend if you don’t have the right people around. This is an excellent product for shower pans if you can get your hands on it, though.

Another minor nitpick is that Quikrete Floor Mud is only available in 80 lb sacks. Even though I only purchase 80-pound bags, it isn’t a big deal since I usually need more than one bag to make a whole shower anyhow.

However, Quikrete Sand/Topping Mix is a good alternative if you need a modest mix or want to handle smaller bags.

Can I use quikrete Topping Mix for DIY concrete shower walls?

Yes, quikrete Topping Mix can be used to make concrete shower pans. Portland cement, industrial-grade sands, and other materials comprise the QUIKRETE Sand/Topping Mix.

There are various sizes available for this concrete mix for shower pans. 10 pound, 40 pound, 60 pound and 80-pound bags are all available. It is easy to find precisely what you are looking for with so much to choose from.

As a result, it’s more accessible than Floor Mud mix at most Home Depots.

Mixing Quikrete Sand/Topping in a bucket, tray, or wheelbarrow is a snap. Mix it using a trowel, shovel, or hoe after you’ve added the appropriate quantity of water to it.

The mix may be spread, packed, and shaped into a shower pan of any shape or slope with relative ease. Shower floors that have been properly installed will be sturdy and silky-smooth.

How can I DIY a concrete shower wall myself?

You can build a concrete shower pan and walls yourself. Read the article to know the instructions.

You may either purchase a bag of pre-mixed concrete or prepare your own. Making concrete is a basic process. Portland Cement, sand, and aggregate like gravel are needed to make it.

The strength and functionality of the concrete may be altered by varying the quantities of each constituent. In a shower pan, cement and sand are all you need.

For various reasons, making your mixes is a good alternative. If you’re mixing a lot of concrete, they’re more cost-effective and adaptable. With Quikrete, the mix is tailored to your specifications.

Additives may be added, although most people prefer to leave them as is. However, if you make your DIY mix, you have complete control over the ingredients. While it’s OK to experiment, I like to stick with the conventional ingredients and ratios used by Quikrete.

You may need:

  • Cement made of Portland Cement with sand
  • Five portions of fine sand are required.
  • The end. A simple mixture of two components and water. You need around 4 quarts of water for an 80-pound bag of concrete.

Making this DIY shower pan mix is just a few simple steps.

  • To begin, measure equal amounts of cement and sand, using a shovel or trowel to mix the dry components in a concrete mixer thoroughly, tray, or wheelbarrow is the second step in making concrete. Pour in water and mix till you have solid concrete.
  • Even though making your shower pan concrete might save you some money, the additional time and effort it requires are worth it.
  • All components must be purchased individually and individually measured out before the mixture can be put together. It’s all done for you with a premixed Quikrete package.
  • If you don’t want a large quantity of concrete or a custom-made mix, I suggest using Quikrete. I don’t think it’s worth the additional effort to take just one shower, in my view.
  • All three choices have the same consistency and mixing process, no matter which you pick. It would be best to end up with a semi-solid substance that is pretty dry after this process.
  • Please make sure you pick it up with one hand and produce an actual snowball with the other. To keep its form, you need to add a dry mix for a wet mix.
  • When pressed, the ball should retain its form yet leak a little water. Your mix is ready to be utilized if it accomplishes both of these objectives. Moisture remains in the mix, even if you want it to be as dry as possible.
  • An 80-pound bag of dry mix typically requires 4 quarts of water. Slowly add water to the mixture. I like to start with two-thirds of the water. Add as required after mixing.

Can I use concrete for building concrete shower walls?

Yes, using Concrete for the walls of your bathroom is a viable option. Using Concrete in bathrooms has been a popular trend since industrial design. Concrete is a common design material in modern interiors, so it’s not like this is the first time something has been done.

On the other hand, Concrete isn’t one of the most popular bathroom design options. Quartz, marble, granite, or another form of stone are preferred by many homeowners when it comes to bathroom wall coverings.

Even while Concrete has its flaws, it has an undeniable fascination that shouldn’t be underestimated; when used correctly, Concrete may give a bathroom a more contemplative feel.

What are the benefits of using concrete for shower walls?

In terms of interior design, there’s no disputing concrete’s impact. You know you’ve entered another universe the instant you go into a restroom with concrete walls.

There are no sounds, no light from outside, and as you run your fingertips over the smooth, stone-like walls, you’re transported to a private industrial sanctuary.

To get the most out of your concrete flooring, you may add concrete walls in your bathroom as well.

A common criticism of concrete as a design material is that it seems out of place when used in a single location. However, this may be alleviated by using it in several locations during the design process.

A calming impression may be achieved in the bathroom by letting the concrete from the flooring flow fluidly up the walls. However, thick concrete on the ceiling is probably not the greatest idea.

Adding concrete walls to your bathroom is stylish to incorporate contrasting textures into your decor. There are many ways to incorporate concrete into your bathroom design, but one of the most popular is pairing it with weathered beach wood or finely-polished Old World furniture.

Concrete and marble both work nicely together. Darker forms of marble, as opposed to brilliant white with pink veins, would look perfectly at home next to concrete walls.

Your concrete walls would look great with a black marble countertop on your bathroom vanity. An unframed circular mirror hung over the vanity completes the look.

If you want a modern, minimalist, or industrial-style bathroom but aren’t sure what kind of wall covering to use, give concrete a serious thought.

As simple as it gets, this wall covering is all one color and has a smooth, bland feel that appears to go on and on indefinitely. It’s possible to add a concrete wall or two to even the most minimalist modern bathrooms.

Most decorating styles may be categorized as either masculine or feminine. Darker rooms with sharp corners and mood lighting are regarded as more masculine, while softened edges, pastel hues, and soft accents are deemed more feminine.

On the other hand, concrete is the ideal material for male bathroom designs since it doesn’t seem out of place in a feminine bathroom. Dark black marble and stainless steel work well with concrete to create a stunning masculine bathroom.

Conclusion

Basement plumbing stub-outs, which may be used to connect up a shower, sink, or commode, may be present if your builder made preparations during construction for constructing a bathroom there. 

Showers may be installed without removing any concrete in basements with main drains located above the basement floor or in basements without basement drains. Installing an up-flush drainage system is the best solution. The water from the shower is pumped into your home’s main drain using this system.

Concrete is prone to discoloration due to its porous nature. Your bathroom is full of things you don’t want to be permanently etched on the walls of your home.

Frequently asked questions (FAQS): How to install a shower in the basement without breaking concrete?

How to install shower in the basement without breaking concrete?

Installing a basement shower over existing plumbing stub-outs is the most efficient and least costly way to do it without breaking concrete. 

If the stub-outs are already in place, you may save a lot of money and time by utilizing them to add a bathroom to your basement. You don’t need to break concrete to run your plumbing lines from the stub-outs.

Sewage is removed from a holding tank behind a toilet, tub, or shower and pumped into the home’s main drain (which connects to a sewer line or septic system) placed at a higher elevation in an up-flush drainage system.

Grinder for liquefying solid waste is also included in the up flush system.

Can I use concrete to build my shower pans?

Yes, you can build your shower pan with concrete. You’ll need to construct a pan if you want to tile the floor of your shower. It is the shower pan that rests under the tile in a shower. They’re designed so that water flows into the drains.

Because you don’t want puddles, leaks, or standing water in your shower, a well-built shower pan is essential. Custom shower pans can be purchased pre-made, but if you want to make one, you’ll have to do it yourself.

Can I use concrete for building concrete shower walls?

Yes, using Concrete for the walls of your bathroom is a viable option. Using Concrete in bathrooms has been a popular trend since industrial design. Concrete is a common design material in modern interiors, so it’s not like this is the first time something has been done.

On the other hand, Concrete isn’t one of the most popular bathroom design options. Quartz, marble, granite, or another form of stone are preferred by many homeowners when it comes to bathroom wall coverings.

Bibliography

Kim, J. K., Moon, Y. H., & Eo, S. H. (1998). Compressive strength development of concrete with different curing time and temperature. Cement and Concrete Research, 28(12), 1761-1773.

Khalid, M., & Aslam, M. (2013). Waterproofing treatment for masonry and lime concrete surfaces.

Leave a Comment