How to install a shower drain on a concrete floor?

The article aims to answer the question “How to install a shower drain on a concrete floor?”. It also aims to list down the steps you can follow to make shower pan and shower walls with concrete at home.

How to install a shower drain on a concrete floor?

  • To access the drain flange, first remove the concrete that surrounds it. Remove all of the concrete from around the drain until you can see the drain flanges and bolts that hold it in place.
  • Tighten the bolts holding the drain and the pipe rough-in into place on the concrete floor. Use a wrench set to determine the correct wrench size for loosening the screws. 
  • When you remove the bolts, you will be able to separate the drain cover from the flange and the actual drain connection by removing the drain cover.
  • Apply pressure to the drain flange with a screwdriver and spin it in either direction until the pipe cement bond breaks. Apply leverage by inserting the screwdriver into the old bolt holes on the flange. Get rid of the old drain in the stack.
  • Use an old cloth to wipe off the pipe stack. Afterwards, use a primer to coat both sides of the shower drain flange, as well as the pipe stack that rises from the concrete slab below. 
  • Apply pipe cement to the male and female attachments and press the new drain into place in the old pipe stack once the priming has dry. In accordance with the manufacturer’s recommendations, let the pipe cement dry.
  • Put the shower drain cover in place by loosening the bolts on the flange and fitting it over the top of the bolts and rotating it until it’s secured in place.. To complete the replacement, use a wrench to tighten the bolts.
  • The drain should be covered with duct tape while you mix up a thick, chunky mixture of concrete in a bucket. Mixing should be done using a margin trowel. 
  • For dust control, spritz the borders of the hole with water from a spray bottle before filling it with concrete. This will ensure that the new concrete adheres firmly to the old one.
  • To finish, pour in fresh concrete and compact it. The flange and bolts of the drain should be entirely encased in fresh concrete. Afterwards, use a flat metal trowel to smooth the newly poured concrete into place on the floor. After the concrete has dried, remove the tape.

What do I need to install a shower drain on a concrete floor?

  • Concrete
  • Quikrete
  • Mop
  • Hammer
  • Drill
  • Nail set
  • Drain 
  • Drain cover
  • Protective gear

How to move a shower drain on a concrete floor?

  • To get from the old drain to the new drain, make a 6- to 8-inch wide red crayon trail over the concrete floor. Be sure to choose the quickest path possible. Concrete may be carved using a red crayon, which is still evident in the finished product.
  • Use an exhaust fan in the bathroom after opening a window to let fresh air circulate. Close all the doors to keep the dust as concentrated as possible and eliminate airflow. Put on a pair of safety goggles and a face mask.
  • It’s time to get rid of that ugly slab of concrete. An angle grinder with a 4-inch concrete-cutting blade may be used to cut through the concrete’s surface. Always stay on the drawn line. 
  • Concrete cutting blades have diamond-studded cutting edges with grooves that reach all the way to the blade’s core.
  • Use an electric chipping hammer to remove the concrete between the cut lines. Using a chipping hammer, chip away at the slab until the blade reaches the earth underneath. 
  • Clear the way of any and all broken concrete. Remove the trash and dispose of it properly.
  • Make a new drain line. Use a thin shovel to dig a trench under the removed concrete. Work your way from the old drain position to the new one. Trench depth must match the depth of the original drain line’s bottom. Keep this sand.
  • The size and material type may generally be found on the old drain line’s side label, which will say “SCH 40” or “1 1/2.” Using the same material and dimensions as the original drain line is required for the new extension. 
  • The new drain pipe should be at least as long as the previous one. Replace the old drain line with a new one of the right length, diameter, and material.
  • Reciprocating saw horizontal pipe of old drain cut. The 90-degree fitting that raises the drain should be at least three inches away from the cutting line.
  • Drain line cut-off items should be positioned at the new drain site. Trim 3 inches off the old drain line and point it toward the old drain line.
  • Using a tape measure, take a reading from the horizontal pipe to the end of the cut-off section. A 45-degree fitting in the trench may be used to determine how far each cut end of the extension pipe has to be from the fitting in order to accommodate a new drain placement. 
  • When expanding a drain line, do not use a 90-degree fitting at all. Mark the pipe with a pencil once you’ve transferred the dimensions to the new piece of drain pipe. Cut the drain pipe at the pencil markings using a reciprocating saw.
  • Make use of PVC adhesive while adhering a coupling to an old piece of horizontal piping and the 3-inch section of that piping that was chopped off. PVC glue should also be used to attach the extension pipe to the couplings. 
  • Glue the 45-degree fittings to the extension pipe if necessary. Let the adhesive cure completely.
  • Take a bubble level and place it on the extension pipe. ‘ if the extension pipe is not sloping towards the existing drain pipe, raise up the end of the pipe and fill it with earth beneath. 
  • In order to get the slope to 1/4 inch per foot, continue to pack earth beneath the extension pipe.
  • Leaks may be found by running water down the drain pipe and inspecting the connections. If there is no sign of a leak, then go forward.

Can I use quikrete floor mud?

Yes, Quikrete floor mud can be used to build shower pans and walls. It is a Portland Cement-based concrete mix. It’s an overlaying mortar for laying travertine, slate, and marble floor tiles and making shower pans as a dry pack mix.

It is simple to compress and shape the mixture to be poured down a drain. Having a water-resistant and smooth surface when it is created makes it ideal for laying tile.

Because QUIKRETE Floor Mud is pre-blended, there’s no need to measure out any of the components. It’s as simple as opening the bag, mixing it up, and getting to work. It’s a breeze to combine and use.

Add the needed water to a mixing tray, bucket, or wheelbarrow filled with Quikrete. For every 80-pound bag of the mix, you’ll need 4 quarts of water. It has the following benefits:

  • This mixture may support heavy stone tiles.
  • Use on the outside or inside.
  • After 28 days of cure, exceeds 5000 psi compressive strength
  • They are easier to use than making your mixes since the math is already done for you.
  • The contour and slope of the floor may be easily molded.

There’s no better concrete mix than Quikrete Floor Mud when it comes to shower pans. To my knowledge, it has never been sold at either Home Depot or Lowe’s. A tile supply shop is where we get ours from.

It might be difficult to achieve the right blend if you don’t have the right people around. This is an excellent product for shower pans if you can get your hands on it, though.

Another minor nitpick is that Quikrete Floor Mud is only available in 80 lb sacks. Even though I only purchase 80-pound bags, it isn’t a big deal since I usually need more than one bag to make a whole shower anyhow.

However, Quikrete Sand/Topping Mix is a good alternative if you need a modest mix or want to handle smaller bags.

 

Can I use quikrete Topping Mix for DIY concrete shower walls?

Yes, quikrete Topping Mix can be used to make concrete shower pans. Portland cement, industrial-grade sands, and other materials comprise the QUIKRETE Sand/Topping Mix.

There are various sizes available for this concrete mix for shower pans. 10 pound, 40 pound, 60 pound and 80-pound bags are all available. It is easy to find precisely what you are looking for with so much to choose from.

As a result, it’s more accessible than Floor Mud mix at most Home Depots.

Mixing Quikrete Sand/Topping in a bucket, tray, or wheelbarrow is a snap. Mix it using a trowel, shovel, or hoe after you’ve added the appropriate quantity of water to it.

The mix may be spread, packed, and shaped into a shower pan of any shape or slope with relative ease. Shower floors that have been properly installed will be sturdy and silky-smooth.

How can I DIY a concrete shower wall myself?

You can build a concrete shower pan and walls yourself. Read the article to know the instructions.

You may either purchase a bag of pre-mixed concrete or prepare your own. Making concrete is a basic process. Portland Cement, sand, and aggregate like gravel are needed to make it.

The strength and functionality of the concrete may be altered by varying the quantities of each constituent. In a shower pan, cement and sand are all you need.

For various reasons, making your mixes is a good alternative. If you’re mixing a lot of concrete, they’re more cost-effective and adaptable. With Quikrete, the mix is tailored to your specifications.

Additives may be added, although most people prefer to leave them as is. However, if you make your DIY mix, you have complete control over the ingredients. While it’s OK to experiment, I like to stick with the conventional ingredients and ratios used by Quikrete.

You may need:

  • Cement made of Portland Cement with sand
  • Five portions of fine sand are required.
  • The end. A simple mixture of two components and water. You need around 4 quarts of water for an 80-pound bag of concrete.

Conclusion

There are instances when you’ll need to replace a shower drain, such as when you’re moving into an older house with an outdated shower drain or when your current shower drain leaks. 

This means that whether you have a plastic shower pan or concrete slab, the procedure of removing and replacing your shower drain will be almost the same regardless of whether you’re dealing with a plastic shower pan or a concrete slab. 

All you’ll need to repair a shower drain in a concrete slab is a few simple tools and protective gear like safety goggles and a dust mask.

Frequently asked questions (FAQS): How to install a shower drain on a concrete floor?

How to install a shower drain on a concrete floor?

To access the drain flange, first remove the concrete that surrounds it. Remove all of the concrete from around the drain until you can see the drain flanges and bolts that hold it in place. Tighten the bolts holding the drain and the pipe rough-in into place on the concrete floor. 

Use a wrench set to determine the correct wrench size for loosening the screws. When you remove the bolts, you will be able to separate the drain cover from the flange and the actual drain connection by removing the drain cover.

Apply pressure to the drain flange with a screwdriver and spin it in either direction until the pipe cement bond breaks. Apply leverage by inserting the screwdriver into the old bolt holes on the flange. Get rid of the old drain in the stack.

Use an old cloth to wipe off the pipe stack. Afterwards, use a primer to coat both sides of the shower drain flange, as well as the pipe stack that rises from the concrete slab below.

How to move a shower drain on a concrete floor?

To get from the old drain to the new drain, make a 6- to 8-inch wide red crayon trail over the concrete floor. Be sure to choose the quickest path possible. Concrete may be carved using a red crayon, which is still evident in the finished product.

Use an exhaust fan in the bathroom after opening a window to let fresh air circulate. Close all the doors to keep the dust as concentrated as possible and eliminate airflow. Put on a pair of safety goggles and a face mask.

It’s time to get rid of that ugly slab of concrete. An angle grinder with a 4-inch concrete-cutting blade may be used to cut through the concrete’s surface. Always stay on the drawn line. 

Bibliography

Kim, J. K., Moon, Y. H., & Eo, S. H. (1998). Compressive strength development of concrete with different curing time and temperature. Cement and Concrete Research, 28(12), 1761-1773.

Khalid, M., & Aslam, M. (2013). Waterproofing treatment for masonry and lime concrete surfaces.

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