How to cut a concrete slab with a circular saw?

The article aims to answer the question “How to cut a concrete slab with a circular slab?”. It will also mention the safety measurements you need to take while working with a circular saw.

How to cut a concrete slab with a circular saw?

  • Decide whether you like to use a dry or wet diamond blade for the task at hand, depending on your preference. 
  • You may use a circular saw or a portable cut-off saw for this method, but wetting the concrete beforehand will help reduce the amount of dust that is emitted throughout the cutting process. 
  • If you want to cut concrete with a wet-cutting blade, you’ll need to utilize a “walk-behind” concrete-cutting saw, which may be done using a variety of instruments. 
  • With a job-specific saw rental, you can cut deeper than you can with a circular or portable saw. 
  • When it comes to cutting through concrete, a 7-inch circular saw can only get you as far as 2-1/4 inches deep; a 14-inch wet cutting blade coupled to a concrete-cutting saw, on the other hand, can get you as far as 4-5/8 inches.
  • Set up a dust-free work area to avoid bringing concrete dust into your house. In the basement or garage, tape drop cloths to any open doors; if outdoors, make sure that any neighboring windows are closed. 
  • Tape a drop cloth or plastic sheet over any air intakes that are near.
  • Using either chalk line (for long, straight edges) or chalk, mark where you wish to cut on the concrete surface. 
  • Thickness is everything when it comes to applying the line. A trickle of water is great for cutting concrete, since it will keep dust at a minimum and ensure that you don’t lose the line.
  • Ensure your own safety by taking all required precautions: Make sure you’re well-protected with your heavy gear, including shin guards, knee pads, and steel-toed boots. 
  • Always use a filtering mask that is correctly fitted. Make sure that the GFCI-protected extension cable is plugged into the power source when using an electric saw instead of a gas-powered saw to avoid power surges, shocks, and overloads.
  • Try to control the flow of water coming from your garden hose so that it falls exactly on the area where you want to cut. 
  • Extend the hose to the work area and run a trickle of water to keep the surface moist while working on a horizontal, flat project like a patio slab. Maintain a constant stream of water flowing over your chalked line while holding the hose in place.
  • A “guide board,” which may be any 1″-deep scrap wood as long as the cut line, should be placed at one end of the cut area, whichever side is most convenient for you.
  • Using the depth lever or knob on the saw, set its blade depth to a maximum of a half-inch deep while the saw is still fully off. When making shallow cuts, this will help you maintain greater saw control. 
  • It’s better to go with a succession of shallow cuts rather than going all-in at once, unless you have a large walk-behind saw that can handle the depth of the cut.
  • Removing the saw from the concrete and allowing it to spin freely will allow the blade to spit out any dust that has accumulated on it and allow it to cool down. Cut for 30 to 45 seconds, then cool for the same amount of time until the job is complete, then repeat.
  • Remove the guide board when you’ve completed the recommended cut. 
  • Take a break from sawing and go back to the 14″ to 12″ deep cut, making sporadic cuts lasting no more than 30 to 45 seconds each time. A 2″-deep incision in the concrete may be achieved using a series of shallow, straight cuts.
  • Despite your best efforts to keep the concrete moist throughout the cutting process, dust will accumulate. Take a pause every now and again to let your mind rest. Clean it up with a broom or a wet/dry vacuum.
  • When you’re ready to cut deeper, turn off the saw and use the depth lever or knob to raise the blade depth by 12-inch increments. When you’ve completed Steps 7 and 8 and established the new width, you may resume cutting.
  • Put the saw and power cable away after clearing the dust from the work area with a broom and dustpan or wet-vac. Then, while wearing your safety gear, hammer away at the concrete that has been cut. 
  • Start close to the cut line, but not directly on it. Swing the sledgehammer with enough power to shatter the concrete, keeping the hammer at least one to two inches away from the cut lines. Use a pry bar to remove pieces of concrete as you break the concrete.

What tools do I need to cut a concrete slab with a circular saw?

  • sandpaper
  • Chalk or marker
  • Personal protective gear
  • Circular saw
  • Wire brush
  • Hammer
  • Chisel

Can I use a concrete saw to cut a concrete slab?

Yes, you can surely use a concrete saw to cut a concrete slab. A diamond-blade concrete saw is the finest option for cutting through concrete. 

There are different sorts of blades that may break up the concrete, produce difficulties with the concrete, or be too weak to cut the rebar in other saws that use concrete.

Professionals will tell you that abrasive blades can still be used on concrete saws to cut through rebar, but this isn’t always true. There are many different viewpoints, but most of us prefer to be safe rather than sorry. Consider the following information while preparing to cut rebar in concrete.

Rebar refers to the steel reinforcing bars that are often used in concrete construction. Because of its high tensile strength, rebar is often utilized in construction.

Compressive strength is high in concrete, although tensile strength is low. If put correctly, rebar may offer around 40,000 pounds of strength per square inch. In the concrete of small constructions, such as patios and sidewalks, rebar is not used. 

Retaining the structural integrity of a building or skyscraper will necessitate the use of reinforced steel. To cut through concrete and rebar, the most popular method is to use a concrete saw, also known as a “circular saw,” a “consaw,” or a “road saw.” 

It may also be used to cut asphalt and tile, among other things. They have a tendency to be more powerful than the majority of saws. Abrasive corundum masonry and diamond blades are the two types of concrete circular saw blades available. 

Blades made of corundum (hard aluminum oxide) are less expensive, but they are slower than those made of tungsten carbide (tungsten carbide). Because they can only cut 1/4 to 1/2 inch deep, you’ll have to cut into the surface repeatedly. 

Apart from that, these blades are short-lived, produce fine dust, and even glow when they’re heated. They have a foul odor as well. Abrasive corundum masonry blades are more cost-effective if you simply need to make a few shallow cuts.

Diamond blades cost more, but last longer. Blades with a diamond/metal composite coating are attached to the outside, revealing sharp cutting edges when it dominates over time. Diamond blades for wet cutting may be smooth or contain teeth, and they must be used with a stream of water. 

The saw must be able to distribute water in a safe manner if it is to cut cleanly and quickly. The water stream may be directed by an assistant while the saw is being used if you’re in a hurry. When ejecting waste, diamond blades used for dry cutting feature teeth that keep the blade cold. 

When you need to make a succession of progressively deeper cuts, they are ideal. When using this procedure inside, cover any duct holes as well as the whole room with duct tape and some plastic.

A walk-behind saw may be used to cut through bigger materials, however most are handled. A wide variety of concrete saws are now on the market. It is possible to fit blades of a specified diameter in each. The normal size ranges from 4 inches to 36 inches.

Depending on the brand and the saw’s weight, prices for saws may vary from $100 to $4,000.

What safety measurements do I need to take to cut concrete with a circular saw?

  • Chalk marker and a 2×4 straightedge should be used to outline the cutting area when using a circular saw. 
  • When using a wet-cutting blade, make sure the water supply is turned on before cutting. 
  • Use your stronger hand to grip the saw’s back handle and your less dominant hand to hold the saw’s front handle.
  • Smaller passes away from your body are necessary to create an initial depression in the concrete. Use the front handle to guide the blade as you guide it backward on the lowest RPM you can get.
  • When working vertically, you may apply pressure to horizontal concrete (flooring), but not when working horizontally. 
  • To keep the work space tidy, you may want to switch the saw off from time to time. 
  • Use a wire brush, a hammer and chisel (if necessary), and high-abrasion sandpaper to clean up after using the saw. 
  • Clean the saw by dismantling it and following the instructions.

Conclusion

Cutting huge pieces of wood, metal, brick, plastic, and even concrete using circular saws is a common task for both professional contractors and DIY enthusiasts. 

Although these circular saws have a great lot of capacity and accuracy, they are not simple to use for novices when cutting concrete. With the correct equipment and expertise, cutting through concrete isn’t as difficult as you may imagine.

Frequently asked questions (FAQS): How to cut concrete slab with circular slab?

How to cut a concrete slab with a circular saw?

Decide whether you like to use a dry or wet diamond blade for the task at hand, depending on your preference. 

You may use a circular saw or a portable cut-off saw for this method, but wetting the concrete beforehand will help reduce the amount of dust that is emitted throughout the cutting process. 

If you want to cut concrete with a wet-cutting blade, you’ll need to utilize a “walk-behind” concrete-cutting saw, which may be done using a variety of instruments. 

Can I use a concrete saw to cut a concrete slab?

Yes, you can surely use a concrete saw to cut a concrete slab. A diamond-blade concrete saw is the finest option for cutting through concrete. 

There are different sorts of blades that may break up the concrete, produce difficulties with the concrete, or be too weak to cut the rebar in other saws that use concrete.

Bibliography

Danielle Smyth. How to Cut Concrete With a Circular Saw. Retrieved from: https://homeguides.sfgate.com/remove-excessive-concrete-facings-56913.html

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